The loan firm provides medical devices to those who cannot afford them

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Over 23,000 residents of Howard County report having one or more disabilities. For many of them, the equipment they need to live independently is not covered by insurance. It can be expensive and not having it can affect their quality of life. Howard County Loan Closet has been helping those in need for years. some level of disability, whether temporary or permanent, ”said Mary Becker, of the Howard County Office on Aging and Independence. The Loan Closet is free and operates through donations. Customers just need a referral and an appointment. What started as a small closet in 2004 is now 7,500 square feet. The space leaves room for nonprofit partners, such as Equipment Connections for Children. “If we have it and you need it, we will give it to you for as long as you need it. Once a child is too big or no longer needs it, bring it back and we will find another family who will. needs it, “said Jason Herring of Equipment Connections for Children. There’s also room in the upgraded closet for technology. A device helps identify color for those who can’t see by holding it close of an object. This is part of a collaborative effort with the Maryland Department of Disabilities. The Maryland Technology Assistance Program has a small demo lending library on-site. “What we wish we could do is is reusing these devices for someone who no longer needs them to put them in the hands of those who need them and can’t afford to buy a device, ”said Denise Schuler, Maryland Technology Assistance Program. Over the past 15 years, he has processed 26,000 pieces of equipment for the residents of the community. Donations go through a long process before they reach a customer. Items are sanitized and volunteers make sure they are suitable for the person who needs them in the hope they are returned. All of this happens thanks to donors and volunteers. “We really are the spirit of the concept of give and take, and the community absolutely loves it,” Becker said.

Over 23,000 residents of Howard County report having one or more disabilities. For many of them, the equipment they need to live independently is not covered by insurance. It can be expensive and not having it can affect their quality of life.

The Howard County Loan Closet has been helping those in need for years.

“We provide durable medical equipment, assistive technology that promotes the safety and independence of people with a certain level of disability, whether temporary or permanent,” said Mary Becker, of the county office of Howard on Aging and Independence.

The Loan Closet is free and operates through donations. Customers just need a referral and an appointment.

What started as a small closet in 2004 is now 7,500 square feet. The space leaves room for nonprofit partners, such as Equipment Connections for Children.

“If we have it and you need it, we’ll give it to you for as long as you need it. Once a child gets over it or doesn’t need it anymore, bring it back and we’ll find a another family that needs it, ”said Jason Herring of Equipment Connections for Children.

There’s also room in the upgraded closet for tech. A device can identify color for those who cannot see by holding it near an object.

This is part of a collaborative effort with the Maryland Department of Disabilities. The Maryland Technology Assistance Program has a small on-site demonstration loan library.

“What we would like to be able to do is reuse these devices for someone who no longer needs them to put them in the hands of those who need them and cannot afford to buy a device. “said Denise Schuler of the Maryland Technology Assistance Program.

The loan closet has grown because it responds to large demands. Over the past 15 years, he has processed 26,000 pieces of equipment for the residents of the community. Donations go through a long process before they reach a customer.

Items are sanitized and volunteers make sure they are suitable for the person who needs them in the hope they are returned. All of this is done thanks to donors and volunteers.

“We really are the spirit of the concept of give and take, and the community absolutely loves it,” Becker said.

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