New $1 million toilet block for Auckland’s ‘last stop’ city

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A toilet block in North Auckland, once called ‘the worst in the country’, has received a million dollar upgrade, but not everyone is impressed.

The Wellsford toilet block looks like any other, but it cost Auckland Council $979,600 to build, $86,000 to design and $68,000 in project management fees for a total of 1 .1 million dollars.

Rodney local board member Colin Smith said the toilets were long overdue and the town had to “scream its guts out” to get them delivered.

However, Smith said homes in Wellsford have sold for between $500,000 and $1 million and he doesn’t understand how a toilet block could cost more.

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“If it were offered to local builders, I think we’d be quietly surprised at how cheap it was. I don’t think Wellsford gets its money’s worth from the supercity.

Rodney Local Council candidate Libby Clews and outgoing Rodney Local Council member Colin Smith in front of the new $1.<a class=1 million toilet.” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

Jason Dorday / Stuff

Rodney Local Council candidate Libby Clews and outgoing Rodney Local Council member Colin Smith in front of the new $1.1 million toilet.

Still, Smith was disappointed that more money had not been allocated for an opening party for the toilet block that would be “an icon of Rodney’s local council”.

“We wanted to welcome toilets to Wellsford because it’s only been a hundred years since we’ve had a new one.”

Libby Clews, a first-time candidate for local council, said wharepaku were “desperately needed” but perhaps not an effective use of fares.

“I was not in the room when it was decided. My priority would be to prepare Wellsford for a future when there is a new motorway.

Clews said if she took office, she would like to “flush out the system” and start more community projects.

The old toilets have been demolished and the space they once occupied will become a “pocket park”.

Jason Dorday / Stuff

The old toilets have been demolished and the space they once occupied will become a “pocket park”.

Samuel Vercoe, a resident of Wellsford, said $1 million was “excessive” but the old ones “had to go”.

“God knows what you might have caught if you had walked into the old toilet. Better to be safe than sorry.”

Peter Alletson of Paparoa, who had stopped by, said the toilets were “nice and clean”, but he was surprised to find a stall with three urinals and two sinks.

However, an unnamed young man said he felt the money had been badly spent and was disappointed that the old toilets had been demolished.

“I had had good memories in that toilet, and now they are gone. A pie, a burger and the toilet – it was a Wellsford combo.

The new seven-cabin toilet cost the council a seven-figure sum.

Jason Dorday / Stuff

The new seven-cabin toilet cost the council a seven-figure sum.

Street preacher Chris ‘Worzel’ Sellars said expensive toilets were a sign of “Babylon excess”.

“The signs are all around us. We are crushed by a collapsing society. [Council staff] need to humble themselves and get right with God.

Bonnie at the Peppers Café said the town needed new toilets, but wished the Council had put some of the money into road repairs and replacing unsafe cobblestones on the footpaths.

She said the day the toilets first opened she inspected each of the cubicles and was worried there was no changing table or visual protection for the urinals in case someone entered. by mistake.

“But, I was very impressed with the toilet seats. They are nicer than Warkworth’s.

Do you have an opinion on the toilets? Contact [email protected]

Auckland Council spokesman Geoffrey Pitman said the project was competitively priced and a “reflective of the current market rate”.

“The design follows best practice guidelines and involved demolishing the old facility, building a new one and creating a pocket park,” he said.

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